breakable fannies

Fanny packs and slings are on the brain. As well as flexible ceramics. Yes, I know I know, ceramic is not the optimal material for wearing and moving about but why not give it a try. I'm not exactly sure why it was ever used  as tableware in the first place, so fragile. The language of eating-ware, 'tableware,' is a language composed of fired and glazed clay. Mud. Funny how the things we eat pristined bites off of are basically made of mud. Which makes me think, how else should the food be served?

So far this semester I've focused on making wearable tableware. I've looked at the current wearable things that carry food: camping gear, slings, fanny packs, etc... And other hanging products in the world of planters. I started the form finding by casting sewn pockets and pouches which turned quite literal. They looked like casted pouches, some looked like butts. I had to do away with the obvious, "that looks like fabric" and shaved away the folds and other textural clues. What amounted was a creased look, similar to folded paper. This is an artist I came across as inspiration, Ruth Gurvich. 

Ruth Gurvich porcelain

Ruth Gurvich porcelain

porcelain planters by farrah sit

porcelain planters by farrah sit

I've arrived a four prototypes. I'd love to spend more time on the form but I'm really excited to test them out. Tuesday they will be bisqued and on their way to glazing and final fire. I'll be adding some post-production materials similar the the leather strap in farrah sit's planters so people can wear the pieces. There will be an event, something with food, something that asks the participant to move and eat at the same time.  I'm proposing a way to eat in between the convenient 'to-go' way and the time-privileged 'for here' way. A ritual or way of eating that reflects the style of the times: eating away from the table. The ceramics are attempts to make eating away from the table with permanent tableware feel less disposable, less of task and more of an experience. 

there's some extra stuff going on at the end here. Prototypes for flexible tablemat/plate. Platemat? For eating on laps, soft surfaces. Then the bug banquet Nic and I attended last night. There's a picture of the silkworm and cricket skewer. Alice Taranto, RISD graphic design, cohosted with Johnson and Wales students. Great job on the bug food, it was pretty tasty, especially the cricket flatbread.